Panel Discussions

WCQR2021 Panel Discussions

The World Conference on Qualitative Research devotes a relevant space to the dissemination of methodologies and results of research conducted by research groups. To that end, the WCQR2021 will include several Panel Discussions presented by Research Groups, subordinated to themes related to the projects developed by these groups and aligned with the WCQR topics.

Feminist Participatory Action Research: A methodology of research and activism

Trimita Chakma1, Dr Naomi Joy Godden2, Kate Phillips3
1 Asian Center for Women’s Studies, Ewha Womans University, South Korea, trimita@ewhain.net
2 School of Arts and Humanities, Edith Cowan University, Australia n.godden@ecu.edu.au
3 Plan International Australia, Australia, katherine.phillips@plan.org.au

 Abstract. This panel session examines Feminist Participatory Action Research (FPAR) as a qualitative methodology for research and social change. The objectives of the panel session are:

  • To discuss and critically analyse the theory and practice of FPAR.
  • To share case studies of FPAR in Asia Pacific and Australia.
  • To explore outcomes, issues and tensions with FPAR, such as impacts on policy, and ethical considerations.

Increasingly, feminist human rights movements around the world are using FPAR to generate knowledge and action to strengthen their movements, challenge power structures, increase their impact, and inform transformational change. FPAR is a cyclical methodology of collective planning, acting, observing and reflecting, whereby women document lived experiences of injustice and take action to demand their human rights and inform structural change (Lykes & Hershberg 2012; Reid, Tom & Frisby 2006). FPAR combines research, gender justice and activism (Chakma 2016), and can be used by feminist social movements to develop, implement and evaluate strategies to challenge and transform patriarchal power. FPAR is an iterative, democratized methodology, and research participants are ‘co-researchers’ and ‘activist researchers’ who collectively generate knowledge and action as experts in their own lives (Godden 2017; Kirby 2011).

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This Panel Discussion will take place on January 22nd, at 1:30pm (Lisbon Time). See the full Program >>

From qualitative methodology to mixed methods in systematic observation of physical activity and sport: An approach to quantitizing

Teresa Anguera1, Oleguer Camerino2, Marta Castañer2, Mariona Portell3
1Faculty of Psychology, Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, España. tanguera@ub.edu
2National Institute of Physical Education of Catalonia (INEFC), Institute of Biomedical Research Foundation Dr. Pifarré (IRB Lleida), University of Lleida, Lleida, España. ocamerino@inefc.es; castaner@inefc.udl.cat
3 Department of Psychobiology and Health Sciences Methodology, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallés, España. mariona.portell@uab.cat

Abstract. In recent years there have been various clashes between supporters of the misnamed qualitative and quantitative methodologies (and we say ‘misnamed’ because the coverage of both is so wide that hardly conform to a methodology in the strict sense). The field of physical activity and sport has not been left behind, and the literature shows us this radicalism. For several decades, systematic observation in physical activity and sport was characterized by qualitative-quantitative radicalism. Our research group works in both dimensions, but in this discussion panel, specifically, we are interested in the qualitative aspect. In our work we have developed: life stories, event descriptions, transcripts of radio broadcasts in sports competitions, interviews with physical educators, comments on discussions in the dressing rooms, etc., which had in common the textual style in which the study began and ended, and that they adjusted to the standards of qualitative research. In Anguera, Camerino, Castañer, Sánchez-Algarra and  Onwuebuzie (2017) it is documented that in the last quarter of the century interest has increased in the use of qualitative methodology in physical activity and sports studies, which can be attributed to a combination of theoretical and pragmatic elements (Moran, James, & Kirby, 2011). In the study by Culver, Gilbert and Trundel (2003), the qualitative papers published in this area only reached 17%. But researchers of physical activity and sport, although without ceasing to criticize the qualitative methodology (Sparkes, 1998), have been progressively attracted by the possibility of delving into the personal perspectives and experiences of the participants of physical activity training and competitions and sport, which involves a wide range of possibilities, and the emergence of the narrative inquiry in physical activity and sport has contributed to this (Monforte, Pérez-Samaniego, & Devís-Devís, 2018; Smith & Sparkes, 2009).

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This Panel Discussion will take place on January 21st, at 3:40pm (Lisbon Time). See the full Program >>

Qualitative Research on Preventing Gender-based Violence

Maria José Magalhães1, Raquel Rodrigues1, Susana Coimbra2, Isabel Viana3
1Centre for Research and Intervention in Education, Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences, University of Porto, Portugal. mjm@fpce.up.pt; raquelrodriguesm@fpce.up.pt
2Centre for Psychology at the University of Porto, Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences, University of Porto, Portugal. susana@fpce.up.pt
3Department of Curricular Studies and Educational Technology, Institute of Education of the University of Minho, Portugal. icviana@ie.uminho.pt

Abstract. Gender-based violence is a comprehensive and complex issue that, also due to its variety of manifestations, has been researched within a vast number of subjects – from Sociology to Psychology to Education, among others – spawning a useful and great number of perspectives and lenses to approach this topic. This panel proposes that, while focusing more on qualitative research methods, both qualitative and quantitative methods combined, can produce “mutually illuminating” (Bryman, 2012, p.628) data. Over the past two decades, violence against women and girls and gender-based violence have been, in specific, acknowledged as a human rights issue and a health problem, with serious damage to the development of children and adolescents (Walker, Tokar & Fischer, 2000; Murnen, 2015; Banyard et al., 2019). Since 2004, schools have been considered privileged settings for primary prevention intervention (Rosewater, 2004) and there has been a growing number of programs being implemented in different countries, and with a variety of participants who plan and develop it with young people (from teachers to organizations, from activists to education professionals, etc.). However, for all the many promising strategies for preventing violence in schools, evaluation of these programs is still scarce and their long-term impact has rarely been studied (Magalhães et al, 2017; Cahill et al., 2019; Crooks, Jaffe, Dunlop, Kerry, & Exner-Cortens 2019). Nevertheless, in recent years it has been discussed the paramount role that educators and the entire educational community involved in the lives of students can have through the learning and apprehension of skills and strategies capable of recognizing and preventing violence (Noleto, 2008; Baker-Henningham, Scott, Bowers & Francis, 2019).

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This Panel Discussion will take place on January 21st, at 3:40pm (Lisbon Time). See the full Program >>

Data Collection Methods Through Online Modalities

 David Lumowa1, Arceli Rosario2, Pavel Zubkov3, Safary Wa-Mbaleka4
1 Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies, Silang, Cavite, Philippines. dlumowa@aiias.edu
2 Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies, Silang, Cavite, Philippines. rosarioa@aiias.edu
3 Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies, Silang, Cavite, Philippines. zubkovp@aiias.edu
4 Adventist University of Africa, Nairobi, Kenya. wa-mbalekas@aua.ac.ke

Abstract. The COVID-19 pandemic has not only affected the world’s economy, the delivery of education and other services, but also how research is conducted. Travel bans and policies on social and physical distancing have restricted researchers’ mobility to reach and be at natural settings and made it impossible for them to have face-to-face interactions with their participants on the site. So the question is, Shall researchers stop conducting research studies because of the challenging times? We would say, No. On the contrary, at these times, research is significantly important, more than ever. We grapple with a phenomenon that is complex and that impacts our lives very deeply. We have many questions to answer, and one of the best tools available to us is the qualitative research approach. Hence, in this panel discussion, our team would like to engage qualitative researchers in a conversation regarding the use of internet technologies for conducting online research, specifically data collection methods such as in-depth interviews, observation, focus group discussions, and other alternatives can be done through online modalities.

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This Panel Discussion will take place on January 22nd, at 1:30pm (Lisbon Time). See the full Program >>